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to the left not holding the bible. the bible was, instead, held by james r. browning, a clerk of the supreme court. a few more pictures to show you. or reagan's swearing-in, jimmy carter, bill clinton and. here's 1985. this is reagan's second inauguration. a different locale, and the reason is because the weather was so bad in washington d.c. in 1985, it was a wind chill factor below zero, and so everything got canceled. the parade get canceled. then moved the of taking indoors and to the capitol rotunda, so there were only about 1,000 people squeezed in. weather has been a problem a few times, as i mentioned. an old picture from 89 in a lot of rain for the inauguration of benjamin harrison. 1945 this was franklin d. roosevelt's fourth inauguration. the war was going on. he was ill. everything was moved to the white house and he took the of have one of the balcony is there at the white house. so you know that fdr had for inauguration's. here's my trivia. you can impress your friends. barack obama is about to tiny franklin d. roosevelt record. how could that be? roosevelt was inaugurated four
was a democrat. he had been a big contributor to edmund brown, helping brown to defeat nixon to become governor of california in 1962. nixon still remembered that. one of the early dirty tricks of the nixon white house was finding a way to get rid of ray. nixon's housing secretary was george romney whose son has been in the news lately. mitt romney's dad complained ray was not being cooperative. he felt he could run fannie mae any way he saw fit. there was also talk that ray might have used fannie mae posted your letter head to raise money for democratic candidates and the white house was getting complaints from republican lawyers in south carolina that democratic lawyers were getting all the fannie mae work related to foreclosures, all the fees. in nine months of taking office nixon hired him -- fired him without giving any public explanation. lapin resisted, said that nixon was turning fannie mae and to what he called a patronage putting. lapin tried to get a restraining order from a federal judge. the judge wouldn't budge. beret kept showing up for work anyway. at one point of the lights wen
jack kennedy is off to the left in the picture and the bible was instead held by james browning who was a clerk of the supreme court. a few more pictures to show you. here's ronald reagan swearing in in 1981 jimmy carter out of president to the right of the picture and bill clinton in 1993 years 1985 this is the second inauguration and notice it is a different locale yet the reason is because the weather was so bad in washington, d.c. in 1985 there is a factor if everything got canceled, the parade canceled, they moved the oath taking in doors into the capitol rotunda so there are about a thousand people and the letter has been a problem as i mentioned in 1989 a lot of rain that today for the inauguration of benjamin harrison and then in 1945 this was franklin d. roosevelt's fourth inauguration. he wasn't feeling well come he was ill and everything was moved to the white house. he took the oath at one of the balcony is there at the white house. so you know that fdr had for inauguration's. here is my trivia for the day you will be able to impress your friends. barack obama is about t
brown shock with sideburns. his body was smooth and his chest was hairless. without definition, though he could attack him and easily. mark twain's mustache and goatee were unimpressive. he wore a coat of smoke and soot, which is the three men played poker, to meet their bare feet, there was a secret tunnel. under that, a huge raft upon which the massive granite building floated. two doors down and a half a block away later murders corner. in early may, he took a two-month visit to john briggs and eight former classmate in hannibal. and literally took hours. a thorough fare he likened to just like being on main street in hannibal and meaningful familiar faces. the montgomery block block dominated montgomery and washington streets. number 722 and 724 montgomery. it had been a gold rush tobacco warehouse and now the man, mark twain, setting his cars. it was cold and sweaty in his palm. he took a swig. a few droplets caught in his horseshoe mustache, and he left them there. he spoke and he had become addicted on the mississippi. he contributed his own cloud and by the barrel for $4, he he
in the store. jackie browne at 26 with no expression on his face said he could get some guns. i finished the book at home and one sitting and felt like i had been set free. hying begins moved the story almost entirely with dialogue to conversations of cops and criminals. their voices establishing the style and driving. i stopped trying to tell what was going on in my books and began to show. i began to show it from the pointing of view and voices of characters bad guys and good ones. the way george used his ear to tell what his people were up to. five years later "the new york times" said i often cannot resist a set piece. with a crazy is kind of scat logical poetry. that's pretty much how i learned to write in a style. i lifted from higgins but changed enough until it became my own sound. i want to thank the national book foundation for my award and recognize the executive director harrold. and his people for keeping this event on track despite sandy trying to stop us. they deserve our thanks and praise. i have to tell you -- [applause] -- i have to tell you i'm energized by the honor.
with this very charming man whose eyes were alternately described as brown, blue and gray. people couldn't even describe how his eyes were. he was charming and gracious and funny and witty and totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly be
the supreme court decision in the brown v. board of education decision 1954. strom thurmond is a recordholder to this day of the longest one man filibuster. and again his work pashtun and the guinness book of world records, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogues. and he was. he was that. he was one of the last jim crow demagogue. what we forget about thurmond is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what do i mean by that? what's a sun belt conservative? the sun belt, it's one of the big stories, one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. and that is the flow of jobs, of industry, of resources and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest in the post-world war ii period. the southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united stat
barnett, frederick douglass and it had a bit effect on a man named john brown who wanted to strike the first blow at harpers ferry. so i guess this is a final thought i would leave you with. one of the most remarkable things about movements from below is that they are unpredictable. you never know when they are going to arise or how. these things that rise up and demands for justice, these demands for equality, these demands for freedom. they are unpredictable and in their unpredictability i think they are also a great source of hope. thank you very much. [applause] we have time for questions and i hope you will have some. we would like you to speak into the microphone if possible. >> during the discussion you talk about roaming around. how did they believe that slaves are brought onto the ship and were shackled and stayed shackled. did they get free somehow? >> is a good question. the standard practice on slave ships was for the men to be shackled but not the women or children. a must the women resisted in which case they would be shackled by the men. but they were not usually sha
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8